Why The Prawn?

And why "Brucely" the printer?

Let's tackle the prawn first.

I'm in Australia. Phrases like "don't come the raw prawn with me" point to the humble prawn (vartiously aka "shrimp" or "crevette" or "garnele" or "gamberi" or "Jīwěijiǔ xiā" among others to our overseas friends) as having some kind of cultural significance to us Antipodeans. "Throw another shrimp on the barbie" was a tragically clueless attempt to make a tourism-friendly slogan that we're still trying to live down. And the sloganistic twit responsible for this disaster is unfortunately still in a public-facing role, and that embarrasses us greatly.

To be clear: We'd never call a prawn a shrimp. Shrimp are those tiny little itty bitty prawns that you get 100 of in a tiny can, floating forlornly in preservative-laden brine and tasting like mild sadness. Prawns are hulking BIG things sized from 12-15cm (5" - 6") up to a size that covers your whole hand when curled up. Prawns have FLAVOUR. We'd never really use the word "throw" in this situation, we'd say "chuck" or "toss" and we'd never just offer ONE lonely prawn - i.e. "I'll chuck a coupla prawns on the barbie for ya, mate." So we're a bit apologetic about that slogan and the prat that helped popularise it. So there's that.

On a more personal level, some of my best memories of youth are spending a few hours on a footbridge over the Inlet, at night on an outgoing tide, with a long tubular net on a long pole picking up prawns ("dabbing") as they swam by undeneath us. And then bringing several friends - and several kilos of prawns - home at 3AM, putting a pot of water on to boil, buttering a few slices of soft white bread and then letting the feasting begin. 

From prawns to rubbish, a really bad segue...

It was while thinking about what we were doing (essentially removing a percentage of the local breeding prawns which were on their way to continue their lifecycles) and what this might be doing to the local fish populations that my eco-conscience finally crystallised into a thing. I came from a really tiny town and the local rubbish dump was not far outside town and on the way to a local body of water we regularly went swimming at. I remembered thinking how much rubbish was at the tip, created by our very small population.

We had no access to the rampant consumerism of the larger towns and cities, and yet that rubbish tip was BIG, and composed mainly of hard waste that didn't seem to decompose. Almost everyone returned glass for a refund and re-used glass jars for storing everything from pickles and drygoods to holding stray hardware. Many households had chickens to dispose of food scraps and provide eggs and the occasional Sunday roast, and the family pets got the meatier scraps. The idea of "pet food" in a can would have been considered strange. Additionally, everything had to be trucked in and that was expensive so everything was well-chosen. The majority of the tip was food tins, scrapped furniture, and other things that did decompose over time. Wood and metal seem immortal when you're young, but in reality they generally decompose quite readily compared to other rubbish.

But there was a new thing creeping onto the pile - plastics. I also moved around a fair bit - there's always new things to learn and do, jobs come and go, opportunities beckon - so I also saw a fair few rubbish tips over time, in widely separated places. And I saw how MUCH plastic was suddenly in our waste stream, everywhere.

The fishing / prawning / farming just helped to focus those past experiences and I slowly began to appreciate how big a problem our waste was becoming. 

 

So that explains the prawn, now what about Brucely the Printer? 

For some reason, the name "Bruce" was the epitome of Australian names. Maybe it was the Monty Python "Bruces" sketch that did it, but they'd have had to base their sketch on some shred of truth, right? So "Bruce" is a quintessential Aussie name, or at least it was back in the 1970s. Stay with me. The pain's almost over. 

Brucely is a Creality Ender3 Pro, and has found itself on my desk in Australia. It's Chinese and Australian.

Creality decided that the logo for the Ender series of printers should be a dragon.

I believe (but am not 100% sure - but I need it for this section so let's go with that) that the printer was themed and named after the Ender dragon in Minecraft, possibly to signify that the printer unleashes creativity just as Minecraft does. 

. . . So . . .

. . . Get ready, we're almost past the pain  . . .

. . . The printer's named after Ender the Dragon . . .

. . . Which sounds like a great movie called Enter The Dragon . . .

. . . Which stars one of the first and finest martial artists
ever to grace a movie screen, Bruce Lee . . .

. . . Bruce Lee was born in the year of the Dragon . . .

. . . At a dinner with George Lazenby in Hong Kong in 1973
prawns would definitely have feature in the menu . . .

. . . his name sounds like Brucely if you say it fast enough . . . 

. . . I'm so glad I brought you along on this journey . . . 

[back to the home screen]